NEWSWATCH: “Hunt for Golden State Killer Suspect Used Genealogy Websites; Ancestry and 23andMe say they weren’t involved in probe that tapped genetic profiles online” – Wall Street Journal/Zusha Elinson

DNA file image, adapted from image at nnml.gov

“After more than 40 years … investigators looking for the elusive Golden State Killer … got their big break [using] genealogy websites …. Police say [72-year-old former police officer Joseph James DeAngelo] was responsible for at least 12 homicides and 45 rapes … between 1976 and 1986. Investigators us[ing] DNA from one of those crime scenes … compar[ing] it with genetic profiles on online genealogy sites …. found a relative of the suspect …. then looked at online family trees to narrow down the suspect ….”

Click here for: “Hunt for Golden State Killer Suspect Used Genealogy Websites; Ancestry and 23andMe say they weren’t involved in probe that tapped genetic profiles online” – Wall Street Journal/Zusha Elinson

 





SCW RUSSIAWIRE: House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence: Russia Investigation

U.S. Capitol file photo

House Permanent Select Committee on #Intelligence
#Russia Investigation

Overview

Following a more than yearlong, bipartisan investigation into Russia active measures targeting the 2016 U.S. #election, the House Intelligence Committee has completed a draft report of 150+ pages, with 600+ citations. The draft report addresses, in detail, each of the questions within the agreed parameters of the investigation, as announced in March 2017. It analyzes: 

  • Russian active measures directed against the 2016 U.S. election and against our European allies;
  • The U.S. government response to that attack; 
  • Links between Russians and the Trump and Clinton campaigns; and 
  • Purported leaks of classified information. Initial Findings


The draft report contains 40+ initial findings that describe: 

  • A pattern of Russian attacks on America’s European allies; 
  • Russian cyberattacks on U.S. political institutions in 2015-2016 and their use of social media to sow discord; 
  • A lackluster pre-election response to Russian active measures; 
  • Concurrence with the Intelligence Community Assessment’s judgments, except with respect to Putin’s supposed preference for candidate Trump; 
  • We have found no evidence of collusion, coordination, or conspiracy between the Trump campaign and the Russians; 
  • How anti-Trump research made its way from Russian sources to the Clinton campaign; and 
  • Problematic contacts between senior Intelligence Community officials and the media.


Proposed Recommendations

The draft report includes 25+ proposed recommendations for Congress and the executive branch to improve: 

  • Election security, including protecting vote tallies;
  • Support to European allies; 
  • The U.S. government response to cyber-attacks; 
  • Campaign finance transparency; and 
  • Counterintelligence practices related to political campaigns and unauthorized disclosures.


Conclusion

The draft report will be provided to the Committee minority on March 13 for review and comment. After adoption it will be submitted for a declassification review, and a declassified version will be made public. The report’s completion will signify the closure of one chapter in the Committee’s robust oversight of the threat posed by Moscow—which began well before the investigation and will continue thereafter.

Additional follow-on efforts arising from the investigation include oversight of the unmasking of Americans’ names in intelligence reports, FISA abuse, and other matters.







NEWSWATCH: “Social Media in Security Clearance Investigations” – Secrecy News/FAS

Montage of Instagram, Twitter and Facebook Logos, adapted from image at NPS.gov

Whoops, better scrub your facebook posts and twitter rants. Secrecy News reports that Congress is focusing on asking the executive branch to delve into social media activity when vetting persons needing a security clearance.

“Members of Congress are urging the executive branch to update and expand the security clearance process by examining the social media presence of individuals … considered for a security clearance for access to classified information. ‘I put more effort into understanding who my interns are’ than the security clearance process does, said Senate Intelligence Committee chairman Sen. Richard Burr at a hearing …. ‘You go to the areas that you learn the most about them — social media is right at the top of the list.’ ‘I can’t envision anyone coming into the office that you haven’t thoroughly checked out everything that they’ve said online,’ …

Tuesday, the House of Representatives passed a bill to promote the use of social media in security clearance investigations. …”


Click here for “Social Media in Security Clearance Investigations” – Secrecy News/FAS





Autoplay/ Autostart for Embedded Youtube Videos

Binary Code with Stylized Eye

?rel=0&autoplay=1

starts a youtube video playing when webpage is loaded

?rel=0&autoplay=0

prevents a youtube video playing when webpage is loaded

(However, at present, the latter is redundant, and not necessary, since the default for the embedded youtube videos already seems to be to not autoplay)



Example:

<iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/MK4Ck3lKoWg?rel=0&amp;autoplay=1″ &amp;autoplay=1″ width=”100%” height=”420″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”></iframe>



To elaborate ….

When embedding a third party video in your webpage, one consideration is whether you wish the video to start playing when the page is loaded, or whether you set it to be started by manually by the user.

The coding for autoplay or autostart has varied for different sources,  and it even has varied over time for the same source.

As of the posting of the this article, in mid-August 2016, the following code works for setting an embedded youtube video to start playing automatically when the webpage is brought up in the browser window, when used within the URL of an iframe.

?rel=0&amp;autoplay=1

Here is the entire coding for the video in question:

<iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/MK4Ck3lKoWg?rel=0&amp;autoplay=1″ &amp;autoplay=1″ width=”100%” height=”420″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”></iframe>

Note that, within the iframe, the following is the portion providing the video URL:

“https://www.youtube.com/embed/MK4Ck3lKoWg”

It is immediately after the final charactger of the URL, before the closing quotation mark, that the added code is inserted:

?rel=0&amp;autoplay=1

The full coding within the quotation marks becomes:

“https://www.youtube.com/embed/MK4Ck3lKoWg?rel=0&autoplay=1″

The full coding for the iframe becomes:

<iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/MK4Ck3lKoWg?rel=0&amp;autoplay=1″ &amp;autoplay=1″ width=”100%” height=”420″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”></iframe>